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U.S. History Topics » Movements » Civil Rights

See Featured 48 Resources
Emancipation Proclamation Commemorative Coloring Book provides an overview of the history of the Emancipation Proclamation for children and coloring pages featuring Abraham Lincoln and notable African Americans, including Frederick...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Historic Places of the Civil Rights Movement shows 41 churches, houses, and other properties related largely to the post-World War II civil rights movement. The links to these properties consist of photographs and texts, and the...  (National Park Service)
Eleanor Roosevelt: American Visionary features photos and artifacts from the life of one of the most dynamic and controversial First Ladies in U.S. history. She was the first First Lady to hold regular press conferences...  (National Park Service)
The Emancipation Proclamation was issued by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863, as the nation approached its third year of bloody civil war. The proclamation declared "that all persons held as slaves"...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Martin Luther King Jr. and the "I Have a Dream" Speech shows an image from the deposition of Martin Luther King regarding copyright infringement. On August 28, 1963, King delivered a speech to civil rights marchers gathered at the Lincoln...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
The NAACP: A Century in the Fight for Freedom features 20 primary documents and resources for learning about the history and achievements of America's oldest and largest civil rights organization, the National Association for the...  (Library of Congress)
TeachingHistory.org provides lessons, teaching guides, best practices, and other resources for teaching history. See videos on "what is historical thinking," teaching history in elementary school, and...  (TeachingHistory.org, supported by Department of Education)
African American History Month Federal Resources The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution...  (Library of Congress)
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month Resources highlights resources in the collections of the Library of Congress, including personal paper and manuscript collections, the LGBT Life Database and the "Serving in Silence" stories...  (Library of Congress)
Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Youth Health provides tips and resources for educators and parents to help LGBT youth thrive in their schools and communities...  (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention)
StopBullying.gov: Educate About Bullying includes activities to teach students about bullying and incorporate the topic of bullying prevention into lessons...  (Department of Health and Human Services)
Rise and Fall of Jim Crow looks at the century of segregation following the Civil War (1863-1954). "Jim Crow," a name taken from a popular 19th-century minstrel song, came to personify government-sanctioned...  (WNET, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
The War Relocation Camps of World War II: When Fear Was Stronger than Justice examines the causes and effects of President Franklin Roosevelt's executive order, signed two months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, that moved nearly 120,000 Japanese and Japanese...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission provides a summary, history, and teaching activities related to the EEOC and this historic law, which forbade discrimination on the basis of sex as well as race in hiring, promoting...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
The Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Congress presents the papers of the 19th-century African-American abolitionist who escaped from slavery and then risked his own freedom by becoming an outspoken antislavery lecturer, writer...  (Library of Congress)
Remembering Jim Crow is a companion to a radio documentary, and examines the system that, for much of the 20th century, barred many African Americans from their rights as U.S. citizens. Read personal...  (American RadioWorks, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
With an Even Hand: Brown v. Board at Fifty presents more than 80 photos, letters, newspapers, manuscripts, maps, music, and films related to the Supreme Court's 1954 decision that "separate educational facilities are inherently...  (Library of Congress)
Brown v. Board: Five Communities That Changed America describes five cases the Supreme Court agreed to hear in 1952 under one title: Brown v. Board of Education. The cases originated in Delaware, Kansas, South Carolina...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Voices of Civil Rights documents the civil rights movement in the U.S. Nearly 50 photos, posters, and descriptions depict important events and individuals: school integration in Little Rock (1957), the...  (Library of Congress)
From Canterbury to Little Rock: The Struggle for Educational Equality for African Americans highlights two historic places and the role each played in the effort toward creating equal educational opportunities for African Americans...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Eleanor Roosevelt brings to life one of the century's most influential women. See the Roosevelt family tree, newspaper columns written by Mrs. Roosevelt, a clip from a TV appearance, a timeline, and a...  (WGBH, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship showcases the African American collections of the Library of Congress. Displaying more than 240 items, including books, government documents, manuscripts, maps, musical scores, plays...  (Library of Congress)
Our Shared History: African American Heritage tells about the Underground Railroad, African Americans in the Civil War, historic places of the civil rights movement, the Delta blues of the Lower Mississippi Valley, and landmarks...  (National Park Service)
American Visionaries: Frederick Douglass features items owned by the famous abolitionist, human rights and women's rights activist, orator, author, journalist, publisher, and social reformer. The site consists of enlargeable...  (National Park Service)
From Jim Crow to Linda Brown: A Retrospective of the African-American Experience, 1897-1953 helps students understand themes of African American life in the first half of the 20th century and explore to what extent the African American experience was "separate but equal."...  (Library of Congress)
African American Perspectives: Pamphlets from the Daniel A. P. Murray Collection, 1818-1907 presents a review of African-American history and culture as seen through the practice of pamphleteering. The site includes sermons on racial pride and essays on segregation, voting...  (Library of Congress)
Race and Place: An African American Community the Jim Crow South recreates the contours of the African American community in Charlottesville, Virginia, during the start of this century. Narratives provide historical analysis as well as archival...  (University of Virginia, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
George Wallace: Settin' The Woods on Fire features the political and personal life of George Wallace. Four times governor of Alabama and four times a candidate for president, he was feared as a racist demagogue and admired as...  (WGBH, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Marcus Garvey: Look for Me in the Whirlwind presents interview clips, a timeline, an online forum of scholars, information about people and events in the film, and a teachers' guide about this immigrant laborer who, in the early...  (WGBH, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Martin Luther King, Jr., National Historic Site features Atlanta's Auburn Avenue, the neighborhood where the civil rights leader was born and raised. "Sweet Auburn," as it came to be called, became the center of African American...  (National Park Service)
Radio Fights Jim Crow looks at a series of radio programs aimed to mend the racial and ethnic divisions that threatened America...  (American RadioWorks, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Papers of Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association offers information about the life of this black nationalist leader, who created a "Back to Africa" movement in the U.S...  (UCLA, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
First Lady to the World: Eleanor Roosevelt at Val-Kill is a curriculum-oriented guide to the work of the active First Lady. The site uses a retreat she built on her husband's estate as a focus but gives readings and suggested school...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Brown v. Board of Education National Historic Site features Monroe Elementary, the school attended in 1950 by third grader Linda Brown. Because she was black, Brown was barred from attending a white school much closer to her home...  (National Park Service)
American Women: A Reference Guide is a "first stop" for using Library of Congress resources to do research in the field of American women's history. It presents some digital items; however, it serves primarily as a...  (Library of Congress)
New Kent School and the George W. Watkins School: From Freedom of Choice to Integration looks at the 1968 Supreme Court ruling that ended a decade of resistance to school desegregation in the South (1955-1964) and triggered massive integration of schools (1968-1973). The...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
From Slavery to Civil Rights is a timeline of African-American history. Photos, broadsides, maps, and other items are organized around time periods: slavery, abolition, antebellum, Civil War, reconstruction...  (Library of Congress)
By Popular Demand: Votes for Women Suffrage Pictures, 1850-1920 offers photos of suffrage parades and pickets, cartoons commenting on the movement, and portraits of Sojourner Truth, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and others...  (Library of Congress)
Oberlin History as American History offers exhibits that tell about the lives and histories of the people of Oberlin, Ohio. The website features the story of an Amistad captive, Oberlin women and the struggle for...  (Oberlin College, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
LGBT Youth: School Experiences on FindYouthInfo.gov includes resources and ideas to help educators create more supportive school environments for LGBT youth...  (Department of Education)
Court Documents Related to Martin Luther King, Jr., and Memphis Sanitation Workers provides fliers and other documents related to the demonstration in Memphis on March 28, 1968. On that day, students near the end of the march broke windows of businesses. Looting...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
The M'Clintock House: A Home to the Women's Rights Movement is a curriculum-oriented guide to a home in Waterloo, New York in which several early abolitionists, women's rights advocates, and social reformers lived. The site uses photos and...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Jackie Robinson: Beyond the Playing Field offers primary documents illustrating how this groundbreaking African American baseball player advocated for civil rights. It incorporates the material into lessons on civil rights...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Scottsboro: An American Tragedy provides a timeline, maps, teachers' guide, and more about the 1931 rape accusation made by two white women against 9 nine black teenagers in Paint Rock, Alabama. The incident began...  (WGBH, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Jackie Steals Home involves high school students in analyzing primary documents related to Jackie Robinson's breaking the color line (when he stepped onto Ebbets field on April 15, 1947) to help them...  (Library of Congress)
Griffith in Context: A Multimedia Exploration Analysis of D.W. Griffith's Birth of A Nation, Georgia provides an overview of a CD-ROM designed to make this film's cultural and cinematic impact tangible...  (Georgia Institute of Technology, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Baseball and Jackie Robinson includes a narrative presentation of early baseball photos (1860s-1920) and a timeline titled "Baseball, the Color Line, and Jackie Robinson" (1860 - 1972)...  (Library of Congress)
Behind the Veil: Documenting African American Life in the Jim Crow South is a research project on African American life during the Jim Crow era (c. 1890s-1950s). It was a time of undeniable oppression and exploitation of black Americans; however, these 60...  (Center for Documentary Studies, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)

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