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U.S. History Topics » Ethnic Groups » African Americans

See Featured 69 Resources
Emancipation Proclamation Commemorative Coloring Book provides an overview of the history of the Emancipation Proclamation for children and coloring pages featuring Abraham Lincoln and notable African Americans, including Frederick...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Historic Places of the Civil Rights Movement shows 41 churches, houses, and other properties related largely to the post-World War II civil rights movement. The links to these properties consist of photographs and texts, and the...  (National Park Service)
The Emancipation Proclamation was issued by President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863, as the nation approached its third year of bloody civil war. The proclamation declared "that all persons held as slaves"...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
African American History Resources celebrates the contributions of African Americans throughout U.S. history. Learn about Harriet Tubman, John Hope Franklin, the Tuskegee Airmen, African Americans in the military...  (Library of Congress)
Voices of Civil Rights documents the civil rights movement in the U.S. Nearly 50 photos, posters, and descriptions depict important events and individuals: school integration in Little Rock (1957), the...  (Library of Congress)
Guide to Harlem Renaissance Materials features music, art, and writing from Harlem during the 1920s and 1930s. Learn about Louis Armstrong, Billie Holiday, Duke Ellington, Zora Neale Hurston, Langston Hughes, James...  (Library of Congress)
African American History Month Federal Resources The Library of Congress, National Archives and Records Administration, National Endowment for the Humanities, National Gallery of Art, National Park Service, Smithsonian Institution...  (Library of Congress)
The NAACP: A Century in the Fight for Freedom features 20 primary documents and resources for learning about the history and achievements of America's oldest and largest civil rights organization, the National Association for the...  (Library of Congress)
TeachingHistory.org provides lessons, teaching guides, best practices, and other resources for teaching history. See videos on "what is historical thinking," teaching history in elementary school, and...  (TeachingHistory.org, supported by Department of Education)
Rise and Fall of Jim Crow looks at the century of segregation following the Civil War (1863-1954). "Jim Crow," a name taken from a popular 19th-century minstrel song, came to personify government-sanctioned...  (WNET, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
The Time of the Lincolns a companion website to the film Abraham and Mary Lincoln: A House Divided, examines the context and conflicts surrounding the Civil War. Topics include the partisan politics of the...  (PBS, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
The Church in the Southern Black Community, 1780-1925 traces how Southern African-Americans experienced Protestant Christianity and transformed it into the central institution of community life. Coverage begins with white churches'...  (Library of Congress)
The Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission provides a summary, history, and teaching activities related to the EEOC and this historic law, which forbade discrimination on the basis of sex as well as race in hiring, promoting...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
The Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Congress presents the papers of the 19th-century African-American abolitionist who escaped from slavery and then risked his own freedom by becoming an outspoken antislavery lecturer, writer...  (Library of Congress)
Ralph Bunche: An American Odyssey examines the life and legacy of this mediator and U.N. diplomat who was the first person of color anywhere in the world to be awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace...  (ETV Endowment of South Carolina, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Remembering Jim Crow is a companion to a radio documentary, and examines the system that, for much of the 20th century, barred many African Americans from their rights as U.S. citizens. Read personal...  (American RadioWorks, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
From Slavery to Freedom, 1824-1909 presents nearly 400 pamphlets written by African-Americans and others about slavery, emancipation, African colonization, Reconstruction, and related topics. Materials range from...  (Library of Congress)
Brown v. Board: Five Communities That Changed America describes five cases the Supreme Court agreed to hear in 1952 under one title: Brown v. Board of Education. The cases originated in Delaware, Kansas, South Carolina...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Our Shared History: African American Heritage tells about the Underground Railroad, African Americans in the Civil War, historic places of the civil rights movement, the Delta blues of the Lower Mississippi Valley, and landmarks...  (National Park Service)
Born in Slavery: Slave Narratives from the Federal Writers' Project, 1936-1938 offers 2,300 first-person accounts of slavery and 500 photos of former slaves. The collection can be searched by name, city, state, topic, or other key words. These narratives were...  (Library of Congress)
Documenting the American South is a full-text database of primary resources on Southern history, literature, and culture from the colonial period through the first decades of the 20th century. Currently, this...  (University of North Carolina, supported by Library of Congress)
African American Odyssey: A Quest for Full Citizenship showcases the African American collections of the Library of Congress. Displaying more than 240 items, including books, government documents, manuscripts, maps, musical scores, plays...  (Library of Congress)
From Canterbury to Little Rock: The Struggle for Educational Equality for African Americans highlights two historic places and the role each played in the effort toward creating equal educational opportunities for African Americans...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Two American Entrepreneurs: Madam C.J. Walker and J.C. Penney features the life stories of two business people who lived the American Dream and who helped make that dream a reality for others in their communities. It tells how Walker, an African...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The West is an online companion to the 8-part PBS documentary. The site is divided into sections dealing with an overall tour, events in the West, places, people, and archives...  (WETA, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
North American Slave Narratives offers more than 250 memoirs, autobiographies, and narratives from individuals who were slaves. An African king who was sold into slavery, the dress maker for Mary Todd Lincoln, the...  (University of North Carolina, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Partners of the Heart is the website for a film about two men who, in 1944, pioneered a procedure that would save the lives of thousands of "blue babies." One of the men, Alfred Blalock, was a prominent...  (WBGH, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Photographs of the 369th Infantry and African Americans During World War I features an all-black regiment that rose to fame at a time when the Army, federal workers, and other parts of society were segregated. The 369th Infantry, also known as the "Harlem...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Radio Fights Jim Crow looks at a series of radio programs aimed to mend the racial and ethnic divisions that threatened America...  (American RadioWorks, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Africans in America is an online companion to the four-part PBS series, covering the period 1450 to 1865. There are historical narratives, resource banks of images, documents, stories, biographies...  (WGBH, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Marcus Garvey: Look for Me in the Whirlwind presents interview clips, a timeline, an online forum of scholars, information about people and events in the film, and a teachers' guide about this immigrant laborer who, in the early...  (WGBH, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Martin Luther King, Jr., National Historic Site features Atlanta's Auburn Avenue, the neighborhood where the civil rights leader was born and raised. "Sweet Auburn," as it came to be called, became the center of African American...  (National Park Service)
Freedom: A Documentary History of Emancipation, 1861-1867 recounts the personal experiences and the drama of emancipation in the words of the participants: liberated slaves and defeated slaveholders, soldiers and civilians, common folk and...  (University of Maryland, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Papers of Marcus Garvey and the Universal Negro Improvement Association offers information about the life of this black nationalist leader, who created a "Back to Africa" movement in the U.S...  (UCLA, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
African American Perspectives: Pamphlets from the Daniel A. P. Murray Collection, 1818-1907 presents a review of African-American history and culture as seen through the practice of pamphleteering. The site includes sermons on racial pride and essays on segregation, voting...  (Library of Congress)
Race and Place: An African American Community the Jim Crow South recreates the contours of the African American community in Charlottesville, Virginia, during the start of this century. Narratives provide historical analysis as well as archival...  (University of Virginia, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
African-American Mosaic is a guide for studying black history and culture. Topics include colonization and Liberia, abolitionists and slavery, western migration and homesteading, Chicago, and ex-slave...  (Library of Congress)
African-American Sheet Music, 1850-1920 contains 1,300 pieces of sheet music including songs from antebellum blackface minstrelsy, the abolitionist movement, the novel Uncle Tom's Cabin, African-American soldiers in the...  (Library of Congress)
From Jim Crow to Linda Brown: A Retrospective of the African-American Experience, 1897-1953 helps students understand themes of African American life in the first half of the 20th century and explore to what extent the African American experience was "separate but equal."...  (Library of Congress)
American Visionaries: Frederick Douglass features items owned by the famous abolitionist, human rights and women's rights activist, orator, author, journalist, publisher, and social reformer. The site consists of enlargeable...  (National Park Service)
An American Success Story: The Pope House of Raleigh, NC tells the story of Manassa Pope, the first black man to receive a medical license in North Carolina (1886). After practicing medicine and helping establish a drug store and insurance...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Oberlin History as American History offers exhibits that tell about the lives and histories of the people of Oberlin, Ohio. The website features the story of an Amistad captive, Oberlin women and the struggle for...  (Oberlin College, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
New Kent School and the George W. Watkins School: From Freedom of Choice to Integration looks at the 1968 Supreme Court ruling that ended a decade of resistance to school desegregation in the South (1955-1964) and triggered massive integration of schools (1968-1973). The...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
From Slavery to Civil Rights is a timeline of African-American history. Photos, broadsides, maps, and other items are organized around time periods: slavery, abolition, antebellum, Civil War, reconstruction...  (Library of Congress)
New Philadelphia tells the story of the first African American to plat and register a town before the Civil War. Born into slavery in 1777 in South Carolina, Frank McWorter moved to Kentucky with his...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Let Your Motto Be Resistance: African American Portraits presents photos of 100 famous and influential African Americans, from with Frederick Douglass and to Wynton Marsalis. Each portrait includes a brief biography...  (National Portrait Gallery, supported by Smithsonian Institution)
Slaves and the Courts, 1740-1860 presents over 100 books and pamphlets on experiences of African and African-American slaves in American colonies and U.S. The documents, published between 1772 and 1889, include trial...  (Library of Congress)
Great Chicago Stories presents historical fiction that illuminates Chicago's past. Listen to (or read) 12 stories about the abolitionist movement; public housing and white flight; labor and the Haymarket...  (Chicago History Museum, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Court Documents Related to Martin Luther King, Jr., and Memphis Sanitation Workers provides fliers and other documents related to the demonstration in Memphis on March 28, 1968. On that day, students near the end of the march broke windows of businesses. Looting...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Back Stairs at Brucemore: Life as Servants in Early 20th Century America looks at the role of servants at a 33-acre estate during the early 1900s. The 21-room mansion was built in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in the 1880s with a separate entrance, dining area, and...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Ethnographic Program provides a map linked to nearly 60 national park sites and resources that emphasize the role of African Americans in the development of American culture, heritage, and history. Each...  (National Park Service)
National Museum of African Art presents images from more than 30 exhibitions -- embroideries, textiles, pottery, jewelry, sculptures, palace doors, chairs, headrests, pipes, cups, drinking horns, bowls, drums...  (Smithsonian Institution)
Scottsboro: An American Tragedy provides a timeline, maps, teachers' guide, and more about the 1931 rape accusation made by two white women against 9 nine black teenagers in Paint Rock, Alabama. The incident began...  (WGBH, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Legends of Tuskegee links to three sites that look at the achievements and impact of Booker T. Washington, George Washington Carver, and the Tuskegee Airmen. In addition to general historical information...  (National Park Service)
Jackie Steals Home involves high school students in analyzing primary documents related to Jackie Robinson's breaking the color line (when he stepped onto Ebbets field on April 15, 1947) to help them...  (Library of Congress)
Jackie Robinson: Beyond the Playing Field offers primary documents illustrating how this groundbreaking African American baseball player advocated for civil rights. It incorporates the material into lessons on civil rights...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
The Fight for Equal Rights: Black Soldiers in the Civil War provides a lesson that uses primary documents such as the Emancipation Proclamation. This lesson correlates to the National History Standards and the National Standards for Civics and...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Selected African American Artists presents several works by African American artists such as Romare Bearden, Willie Cole, and Sam Gilliam...  (National Gallery of Art)
Saint Gaudens' Memorial to Shaw and the Massachusetts 54th Regiment focuses on the powerful memorial created to honor one of the first African-American units of the Civil War. Six sections of in-depth material explore the artist and his working...  (National Gallery of Art)
The Shaw Memorial focuses on the powerful memorial created by Saint-Gaudens to honor one of the first African-American units of the Civil War. Six sections of in-depth material explore the artist and...  (National Gallery of Art)
Exploring Amistad: Race and the Boundaries of Freedom in Antebellum Maritime America examines the Amistad revolt, a shipboard uprising of slaves off the coast of Cuba. It uses timelines, a library of historical documents, a discovery section and bibliography to teach...  (Mystic Seaport, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Teacher and Student Resources at the National Museum of American Art offers the "Pueblo Indian Watercolors" teachers guide on interpreting the meaning of artistic images, an interactive guide on one of America's most powerful African-American painters...  (National Museum of American Art, supported by Smithsonian Institution)
Chicago's Black Metropolis: Understanding History through a Historic Place is a curriculum-oriented site concentrating on the area, south of the main business district, where blacks lived in Chicago, Illinois. The site shows photos and maps of historic...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
To Kill a Mockingbird is a lesson plan for teachers that uses primary source materials on the Depression and Southern and African American experiences. The unit emphasizes language arts and offers...  (Library of Congress)
Baseball and Jackie Robinson includes a narrative presentation of early baseball photos (1860s-1920) and a timeline titled "Baseball, the Color Line, and Jackie Robinson" (1860 - 1972)...  (Library of Congress)
The African-American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920 explores the diversity and complexity of African-American culture in Ohio. These manuscripts, texts, and images focus on themes that include slavery, emancipation, abolition, the...  (Library of Congress)
Black History Month Feature Stories offers 28 public service announcements for radio. Each 60-second sound clip tells the story of one African American who made significant contributions in architecture, art, automobile...  (U.S. Census Bureau)
The Online Academy highlights artifacts, scholars, collectors, and preservers of African American history. Features include the inventor of the multiple effect vacuum process for producing sugar, the...  (Anacostia Museum and Center for African American History and Culture, supported by Smithsonian Institution)
Iron Hill School: An African-American One-Room School is a curriculum-oriented guide focusing on a school constructed in 1923 in a rural area of northern Delaware, one of more than 80 schools for African-American children built between...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)

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