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-1607: Three Worlds Meet (23)
1607-1763: Colonization (26)
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Other History & Social Studies: U.S. History Time Periods (8)
 
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U.S. Time Periods » 1801-1861: Expansion

See Featured 84 Resources
TeachingHistory.org provides lessons, teaching guides, best practices, and other resources for teaching history. See videos on "what is historical thinking," teaching history in elementary school, and...  (TeachingHistory.org, supported by Department of Education)
Religion and the Founding of the American Republic examines the role religion played in the founding of the American colonies, in the shaping of early American life and politics, and in forming the American Republic...  (Library of Congress)
A Century of Lawmaking for a New Nation, U.S. Congressional Documents and Debates, 1774-1873 includes documents from the Continental Congress, the Constitutional Convention and ratification debates, and the first two federal congresses. These documents record American history...  (Library of Congress)
American Indians of the Pacific Northwest features more than 2,300 photographs and 7,700 pages of text relating to the American Indians in two cultural areas of the Pacific Northwest: the Northwest Coast and Plateau. These...  (Library of Congress)
The Thomas Jefferson Papers contains more than 20,000 digitized images of various letters, memoranda, notes, and drafts of documents, books, papers, letters, and manuscripts of the third President, as well as...  (Library of Congress)
Pioneering the Upper Midwest: Books from Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, 1820-1910 portrays the states of Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin from the 17th to the early 20th century through first-person accounts, biographies, promotional literature, local histories...  (Library of Congress)
The Nineteenth Century in Print: the Making of America in Books and Periodicals presents digitized books and periodicals published in the U.S. during the 19th century. The collection includes 23 popular magazines and more than 1,500 books that illuminate themes...  (Library of Congress)
American Notes: Travels in America, 1750-1920 provides 253 narratives describing travels in the colonies and U.S. The collection includes works by authors not widely known as well as by Matthew Arnold, James Fenimore Cooper...  (Library of Congress)
Journeys West helps students examine the motivations of people who traveled west during the 1800s, as well as the conditions they encountered, the conflicts between settlers and native people, and...  (Library of Congress)
Fill up the Canvas features journal entries from 20 points in the journey of Lewis and Clark: mission preparations, winter in St. Louis, first council with Indians, death of Sergeant Floyd, first...  (Library of Congress)
From Slavery to Freedom, 1824-1909 presents nearly 400 pamphlets written by African-Americans and others about slavery, emancipation, African colonization, Reconstruction, and related topics. Materials range from...  (Library of Congress)
Rivers, Edens, Empires: Lewis & Clark and the Revealing of America looks at historical maps, relations with Indians, and expedition artifacts -- the blunderbuss, Jefferson's secret message to Congress, his instructions for Meriwether Lewis, and...  (Library of Congress)
Our Documents features 100 milestone documents in U.S. history. Each week, the website highlights 3 documents. Speeches, treaties, Supreme Court cases, patent designs, and Constitutional...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
History Matters is a gateway to web resources and threaded discussions for high school and college teachers of U.S. history survey courses. It presents first-person narratives about the experiences of...  (George Mason University, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600-2000 introduces students to primary documents related to women and social movements in the U.S. between 1830 and 1930, including letters and newspapers articles on the role of African...  (Binghamton University (NY), supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
A Life Apart: Hasidism in America is a documentary on this movement within Orthodox Judaism. The Hasidic ideal is to live a hallowed life in which even the most mundane action is sanctified. Hasidim live in...  (Alternative Media Information Center, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
The West is an online companion to the 8-part PBS documentary. The site is divided into sections dealing with an overall tour, events in the West, places, people, and archives...  (WETA, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Grant-Kohrs Ranch commemorates America's frontier cattle era. The ranch—located north of Yellowstone in Deer Lodge, Montana—is among the best surviving examples of an economic strategy based on the...  (National Park Service)
Explore the West with the Lewis and Clark Expedition is a travel itinerary of 41 forts, Indian villages, mounds, mountain passes, trails, caves, and other sites along the 8,000-mile journey. The expedition -- launched from St. Charles...  (National Register of Historic Places, supported by National Park Service)
Three Historic Nevada Cities: Carson City, Reno, Virginia City tells the stories of three cities established after the Comstock Lode discovery in 1859 brought a "reverse migration" from California. The stories, told by this travel itinerary of 57...  (National Register of Historic Places, supported by National Park Service)
The Building of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal helps students realize the role canals played in western expansion and in the evolution of transportation by focusing on the construction of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. Students can...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Ohio & Erie Canal: Catalyst of Economic Development for Ohio tells how the construction of this canal transformed one of the poorest states in the Union in the 1820s into the third most prosperous by 1840. The 308-mile canal helped open New...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Hopewell Furnace: A Pennsylvania Iron-making Plantation tells the story of one of the 65 small ironworks operating in southeast Pennsylvania during the American Revolution. The Hopewell Furnace, located in forested hills and valleys along...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Lewis and Clark Expedition: Documenting the Uncharted Northwest recounts the expedition's crossing of the Lemhi Pass and Lolo Trail, and the time spent at Fort Clatsop near the Pacific Ocean. Although the Corps of Discovery did not realize its...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Paterson, New Jersey: America's Silk City examines conditions that led to the famous 1913 strike in a city that produced nearly half the U.S.'s manufactured silk. Conflicts between labor and management increased in the U.S...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Trail of Tears: The Forced Relocation of the Cherokee Nation tells about the removal of the Cherokee Nation from their ancestral homeland (NC, TN, GA, AL) to "Indian Territory" (now Oklahoma). After passage of the Indian Removal Act and the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Lewis and Clark as Naturalists presents flora and fauna as they described it on their 3,700-mile journey launched in St. Louis in May 1804. Follow the Lewis and Clark trail using an interactive map, or browse the...  (Smithsonian Institution)
Lewis and Clark: Mapping the West features maps of the famous expedition. The Corps of Discovery collected 30 maps from Indians, trappers, and traders, and prepared 140 maps -- most of them drawn or compiled by Clark...  (Smithsonian Institution)
Campfire Stories with George Catlin: An Encounter of Two Cultures takes students on a virtual journey with the artist and ethnologist to meet Native Americans of the 1830s. His portraits, scenes of American Indian life, and writings depict cultures...  (Smithsonian Institution)
Mathew Brady Portraits survey the life and work of this pioneering photojournalist and portraitist best known for his photographs of the Civil War. Visitors can read about Brady's contributions toward...  (National Portrait Gallery, supported by Smithsonian Institution)
Lewis and Clark: The National Bicentennial Exhibition is a multimedia exhibit that follows the Corps of Discovery from the Mississippi and Missouri Rivers through the human geography of western North America. Explore 29 places and events...  (Missouri Historical Society, supported by Multiple Agencies)
Getting the Message Out! National Political Campaign Materials, 1840-1860 looks at politics in antebellum America. Read about the presidential campaigns. See campaign biographies of the candidates -- from William Harrison, Martin Van Buren, and James...  (Abraham Lincoln Historical Digitization Project, supported by Institute of Museum and Library Services)
Adeline Hornbek and the Homestead Act: A Colorado Success Story explores how Adeline Hornbek, single mother of four, defied traditional gender roles to become the owner of a successful ranch under the Homestead Act...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Lewis and Clark 200 represents an effort by 32 federal agencies and organizations to provide a web portal for information about Lewis and Clark historical places. It profiles Lewis and Clark and other...  (Multiple Agencies)
Glorieta and Raton Passes: Gateways to the Southwest examines the role of these two passes in ensuring that the Southwest would become and remain part of the U.S. Learn about traders and armies that depended on the passes, which were...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Old Mormon Fort: Birthplace of Las Vegas, Nevada recalls the individuals and events leading to the creation of Las Vegas. In 1855, Brigham Young sent 30 men to farm, convert Indians, and build a settlement along a trail to the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
New Philadelphia tells the story of the first African American to plat and register a town before the Civil War. Born into slavery in 1777 in South Carolina, Frank McWorter moved to Kentucky with his...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Thomas Jefferson's Plan for the University of Virginia: Lessons from the Lawn tells the story of the creation of the University of Virginia. After serving as President, Jefferson continued advocating for a statewide system of education in Virginia, hoping to...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Waterford, Virginia: From Mill Town to National Historic Landmark tells the story of a village west of Washington, D.C. In 1733, Amos Janney purchased 400 acres along Catoctin Creek and built a mill for grinding flour and sawing wood. As fellow...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Chattanooga, Tennessee: Train Town helps students see how geography and promotion combined to encourage the growth of Chattanooga, Tennessee, and how railroads shaped the organization and architecture of this and other...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Decatur House: A Home of the Rich and Powerful examines the life of Stephen Decatur, a naval hero who died as a result of a duel in 1820, and considers the role the house he built played in the political and social scene of the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Building America's Industrial Revolution: The Boott Cotton Mills of Lowell, Massachusetts features one of the oldest surviving textile mill complexes in the U.S. Learn how technology revolutionized the textile-manufacturing industry, and, in turn, affected mill...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Allegheny Portage Railroad: Developing Transportation Technology shows the innovative transportation system used in the 1820s-1840s to tow railroad cars up and down the steep slopes of the Allegheny Mountains...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Nineteenth-Century America in Art and Literature presents documents paired with 7 paintings, including Mahantango Valley Farm, Jolly Flatboatmen, and White Cloud, Head Chief of the Iowas. These...  (National Gallery of Art)
Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail provides information about activities and education programs related to the 3,700-mile trail that the Corps of Discovery traveled. Most of the trail follows the Missouri and Columbia...  (National Park Service)
Shaker Historic Trail presents 15 places that together reveal the legacy of one of the most compelling religious and social movements in American life. Three essays trace the growth of the United Society...  (National Park Service)
The Amana Colonies looks at the historic utopian society established in the 1850s along the Iowa River by German-speaking settlers from a religious group known as the Community of True Inspiration. The...  (National Park Service)
American Visionaries: Frederick Douglass features items owned by the famous abolitionist, human rights and women's rights activist, orator, author, journalist, publisher, and social reformer. The site consists of enlargeable...  (National Park Service)
Africans in America is an online companion to the four-part PBS series, covering the period 1450 to 1865. There are historical narratives, resource banks of images, documents, stories, biographies...  (WGBH, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Oberlin History as American History offers exhibits that tell about the lives and histories of the people of Oberlin, Ohio. The website features the story of an Amistad captive, Oberlin women and the struggle for...  (Oberlin College, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Nat Turner: A Troublesome Property is the companion website of a film that examines the story of Turner and his revolt and how that story has been re-told repeatedly since 1831. Turner, a slave and preacher in...  (Independent Television Service, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
First American West: The Ohio River Valley, 1750-1820 consists of letters, journals, books, newspapers, maps, and images documenting the land, peoples, and exploration of the trans-Appalachian West. The first European travelers, their...  (Library of Congress)
Slavery and Abolition presents two dozen publications written in the 19th century about slavery in America. It includes first-person accounts from former slaves, judicial opinions, abolitionist pieces, and...  (Library of Congress)
The Homestead Act of 1862 recounts efforts to improve homesteading laws and make land ownership possible for more settlers. The distribution of government lands had been an issue since the Revolutionary War...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Expansion and Reform (1801-1868) features documents, maps, and images for learning about the Lewis and Clark Expedition, the growth of regionalism, the Amistad case, Lincoln's "spot resolutions," the Treaty of...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Lewis and Clark offers maps, manuscripts, timelines, and photos related to the famed expedition. It includes resources for learning about Meriwether Lewis, Sacagawea, Congress's role in the Louisiana...  (Library of Congress)
Sunday School Books: Shaping the Values of Youth in Nineteenth-Century America presents 170 Sunday school books published in America between 1815 and 1865. They document the culture of religious instruction of youth during the Antebellum era and illustrate...  (Library of Congress)
The Learning Page helps teachers use the Library of Congress's "American Memory" website to teach U.S. history and culture. It includes suggestions for using photos, objects, life histories and other...  (Library of Congress)
America's First Look into the Camera: Daguerreotype Portraits and Views, 1839-1864 consists of more than 650 photographs dating from 1839 to 1864. Portrait daguerreotypes produced by the Mathew Brady studio make up the major portion of the collection. The collection...  (Library of Congress)
Railroad Maps of North America offers progress report surveys for individual railroad lines, official government surveys, promotional maps, maps showing land grants and rights-of-way, and route guides published by...  (Library of Congress)
African American Perspectives: Pamphlets from the Daniel A. P. Murray Collection, 1818-1907 presents a review of African-American history and culture as seen through the practice of pamphleteering. The site includes sermons on racial pride and essays on segregation, voting...  (Library of Congress)
Louisiana: European Explorations and the Louisiana Purchase features an essay accompanied by 119 documents and maps that tell the story of the Louisiana Purchase. Learn about Louisiana under French rule and later Spanish rule. Find out why...  (Library of Congress)
Anti-Railroad Propaganda Poster: The Growth of Regionalism, 1800-1860 uses a poster decrying the disruptive influence of railroads on local culture to launch a discussion on local differences and their effect on American politics. Explanatory text...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Murder at Harvard is the companion website for a film about a murder that shook Boston in November 1849. It began when Dr. George Parkman, a scion of one of Boston's richest families, disappeared. A...  (Center for Independent Documentary, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
The Lewis and Clark Expedition presents 13 documents and photos related to the 1804-6 expedition into the newly acquired Louisiana Territory. The documents include a list of Indian presents Lewis purchased, his...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
The U.S.-Mexican War is an online companion to a PBS documentary about the war, its background, and consequences. It features references, a timeline, a bulletin board public discussion, and is available...  (KERA, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Donner Party provides a transcript, map, and essays for a TV program that tells the harrowing tale of what tragically became one of the most famous of wagon trains. The Donner party set out from...  (WGBH, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
San Antonio Missions: Spanish Influence in Texas explores a group of 18th-century missions in modern San Antonio to learn about the Spanish influence on native peoples and the patterns of Texas culture. Students can learn about the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Martin Van Buren's "Return to the Soil" is a curriculum-oriented site using the home, named Lindenwald, the eighth President moved to after his term in office to introduce a discussion of Van Buren and his times. The site...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
When Rice Was King concentrates on Georgetown County, South Carolina, where rice, rather than cotton, was the principal commercial product. The site contains maps, readings, photos, drawings, as well as...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Mechanics Hall: Symbol of Pride and Industry traces the history of Mechanics Hall and Worcester back to the industrial revolution. Built by the mechanics association for classes, public debates, lectures, and entertainment, the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Establishing Borders: The Expansion of the United States, 1846-48 offers geography and history activities showing how two years in history had an indelible impact on American politics and culture. Students interpret historical maps, identify...  (Smithsonian Institution)
The M'Clintock House: A Home to the Women's Rights Movement is a curriculum-oriented guide to a home in Waterloo, New York in which several early abolitionists, women's rights advocates, and social reformers lived. The site uses photos and...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Santa Clara County, California's Historic Silicon Valley features 28 historic places that illustrate how this fertile valley blossomed from small agricultural towns linked by railroad into a center of technological innovation. Located south...  (National Park Service)
The Battle of Horseshoe Bend: Collisions of Cultures looks at the decisive battle of the Creek War (1813-1814), where Andrew Jackson fought 1,000 American Indian warriors who were trying to regain autonomy. It examines the history of...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Bent's Old Fort National Historic Site's Learning Page examines the people and construction of Bent's Fort, and the Santa Fe Trail. Built originally in 1833, this adobe fort became a center of trade with Indians and trappers. For much of...  (National Park Service)
The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo presents documents pertaining to the treaty that brought an official end to the Mexican-American War. Materials for teachers and links to other resources accompany the documents...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
The Amistad Case presents documents produced around and during the historic 1841 trial of 53 Africans, captured and sold as slaves, and subsequently accused of murder for commandeering the slave ship...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Exploring Amistad: Race and the Boundaries of Freedom in Antebellum Maritime America examines the Amistad revolt, a shipboard uprising of slaves off the coast of Cuba. It uses timelines, a library of historical documents, a discovery section and bibliography to teach...  (Mystic Seaport, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Tally of the 1824 Electoral College Vote focuses on the complex system of election rules by examining the vote tally of the 1824 Presidential election, in which the winning candidate, John Quincy Adams, received fewer popular...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
California As I Saw It: First-Person Narratives of California's Early Years, 1849-1900 consists of texts and illustrations of 190 works documenting California's history from the Gold Rush to the turn of the century. It captures the pioneer experience; encounters between...  (Library of Congress)
Puerto Rico at the Dawn of the Modern Age, 1831-1929 portrays the early history of the commonwealth of Puerto Rico through first-person accounts, political writings, and histories drawn from the Library of Congress's general collections...  (Library of Congress)
The Lewis and Clark Journey of Discovery provides games, quizzes, profiles of members of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, and lesson ideas and teacher resources...  (National Park Service)
Whitman Mission National Historic Site -- The Learning Place offers a teaching guide about the mission of Marcus and Narcissa Whitman at Waiilatpu, an important way station in the early days of the Oregon Trail. The Whitmans labored to bring...  (National Park Service)

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