Skip Navigation
FREE: Federal Resources for Educational Excellence - Teaching and Learning Resources From Federal Agencies
RSS



Home
Subject Map
Go
U.S. Time Periods
-1607: Three Worlds Meet (23)
1607-1763: Colonization (26)
1763-1815: Revolution (73)
1801-1861: Expansion (84)
1850-1877: Civil War & Reconstruction (101)
1865-1920: Modern America (119)
1914-1945: World Wars (102)
1945-Present: Contemporary America (65)
Other History & Social Studies: U.S. History Time Periods (8)
 
What's New
Calendar

U.S. Time Periods » 1865-1920: Modern America

See Featured 119 Resources
TeachingHistory.org provides lessons, teaching guides, best practices, and other resources for teaching history. See videos on "what is historical thinking," teaching history in elementary school, and...  (TeachingHistory.org, supported by Department of Education)
Emile Berliner and the Birth of the Recording Industry provides a selection of more than 500 letters, lectures, photos, articles, and sound recordings related to the birth of the recording industry. Hear auctioneers, animal calls, musical...  (Library of Congress)
Journeys West helps students examine the motivations of people who traveled west during the 1800s, as well as the conditions they encountered, the conflicts between settlers and native people, and...  (Library of Congress)
The Frederick Douglass Papers at the Library of Congress presents the papers of the 19th-century African-American abolitionist who escaped from slavery and then risked his own freedom by becoming an outspoken antislavery lecturer, writer...  (Library of Congress)
Before and After the Great Earthquake and Fire, 1897-1916 provides 26 films of San Francisco from before and after the Great Earthquake and Fire. The earthquake struck on April 18, 1906, along the San Andreas Fault, damaging most central...  (Library of Congress)
The Chinese in California, 1850-1925 presents 8,000 photos, paintings, letters, diary excerpts, pamphlets, and speeches that portray the experiences of Chinese immigrants in California during that time period...  (Library of Congress)
From Slavery to Freedom, 1824-1909 presents nearly 400 pamphlets written by African-Americans and others about slavery, emancipation, African colonization, Reconstruction, and related topics. Materials range from...  (Library of Congress)
American Environmental Photographs, 1891-1936 consists of 4,500 photographs of natural environments, ecologies, and plant communities in the United States taken between 1891 and 1936. These photographs show a wide range of...  (Library of Congress)
Historic American Sheet Music, 1850-1920 presents 3,000 pieces of sheet music drawn from a collection at Duke University. The selection covers a variety of music types including bel canto, minstrel, protest, plantation, and...  (Library of Congress)
First Person Narratives of the American South, 1860-1920 documents the culture of the 19th century American South from the viewpoint of Southerners. It includes diaries, autobiographies, memoirs, ex-slave narratives, and travel accounts of...  (Library of Congress)
Traveling Culture: Circuit Chautauqua in the Twentieth Century presents nearly 8,000 publicity brochures, ads, and talent circulars for more than 4,500 lecturers, teachers, preachers, politicians, actors, singers, magicians and others who...  (Library of Congress)
American Indians of the Pacific Northwest features more than 2,300 photographs and 7,700 pages of text relating to the American Indians in two cultural areas of the Pacific Northwest: the Northwest Coast and Plateau. These...  (Library of Congress)
When Work is Done is a lesson plan that uses photographs as primary sources and that can help students develop historical analysis skills. After completing the introductory lesson using photographs as...  (Library of Congress)
American Leaders Speak: Recordings from World War I and the 1920 Election, 1918-1920 consists of 59 sound recordings of speeches by American leaders at the turn of the century. Speakers include Warren G. Harding, James Cox, Calvin Coolidge, Franklin D. Roosevelt...  (Library of Congress)
The Alexander Graham Bell Family Papers, 1862-1939 contains correspondence, scientific notebooks, journals, blueprints, articles, and photographs documenting the invention of the telephone, his involvement in the first telephone...  (Library of Congress)
Music for the Nation: American Sheet Music, 1870-1885 consists of tens of thousands of pieces of sheet music registered for copyright during the post-Civil War era. Included are popular songs, piano music, sacred music and secular choral...  (Library of Congress)
Theodore Roosevelt: His Life and Times on Film features 104 short films which record events in Roosevelt's life from the Spanish-American War in 1898 to his death in 1919. In addition to scenes of Roosevelt, these films include...  (Library of Congress)
Pioneering the Upper Midwest: Books from Michigan, Minnesota, and Wisconsin, 1820-1910 portrays the states of Michigan, Minnesota and Wisconsin from the 17th to the early 20th century through first-person accounts, biographies, promotional literature, local histories...  (Library of Congress)
The American Variety Stage: Vaudeville and Popular Entertainment, 1870-1920 is a multimedia anthology illustrating the vibrant and diverse forms of popular entertainment, especially vaudeville, that thrived from 1870-1920. Included are 334 English- and...  (Library of Congress)
The Nineteenth Century in Print: the Making of America in Books and Periodicals presents digitized books and periodicals published in the U.S. during the 19th century. The collection includes 23 popular magazines and more than 1,500 books that illuminate themes...  (Library of Congress)
American Notes: Travels in America, 1750-1920 provides 253 narratives describing travels in the colonies and U.S. The collection includes works by authors not widely known as well as by Matthew Arnold, James Fenimore Cooper...  (Library of Congress)
Our Documents features 100 milestone documents in U.S. history. Each week, the website highlights 3 documents. Speeches, treaties, Supreme Court cases, patent designs, and Constitutional...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Baseball: The National Pastime in the National Archives eBook covers of the role of baseball during the two world wars, contract disputes, civil rights, equal access and opportunity on and off the playing field, the steroids era, the universal...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Picturing Modern America helps students learn about modern America (1880-1920) by analyzing primary sources. Topics include immigration, the city, women and suffrage, industrialization, the West, children's...  (Education Development Center, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
The Most Dangerous Woman in America is a companion website for a film that examines the case of Typhoid Mary, a cook who was quarantined for life against her will in the early 1900s. The site includes a history of...  (NOVA, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Reporting America at War explores the role of journalists in covering America's wars. The website, companion to a PBS documentary, offers a teachers guide with lessons on press censorship, message control...  (Insignia Films and WETA, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
The Emergence of Modern America (1890-1930) features the 1897 petition against the annexation of Hawaii, political cartoons on progressivism and the 1912 election, woman suffrage and the 19th Amendment, the Zimmermann telegram...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Remembering Jim Crow is a companion to a radio documentary, and examines the system that, for much of the 20th century, barred many African Americans from their rights as U.S. citizens. Read personal...  (American RadioWorks, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
The West is an online companion to the 8-part PBS documentary. The site is divided into sections dealing with an overall tour, events in the West, places, people, and archives...  (WETA, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Andrew Carnegie: The Richest Man in the World is an online companion to film documentary on a man who was fond of saying "The man who dies rich, dies disgraced." Carnegie amassed a fortune, then gave it away. Millions of dollars...  (WGBH, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
American Masters: Edward Curtis offers an essay, timeline, and other information about this photographer who took more than 40,000 images and recorded rare ethnographic information from over 80 American Indian tribal...  (WNET, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
History Matters is a gateway to web resources and threaded discussions for high school and college teachers of U.S. history survey courses. It presents first-person narratives about the experiences of...  (George Mason University, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Rise and Fall of Jim Crow looks at the century of segregation following the Civil War (1863-1954). "Jim Crow," a name taken from a popular 19th-century minstrel song, came to personify government-sanctioned...  (WNET, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Women and Social Movements in the United States, 1600-2000 introduces students to primary documents related to women and social movements in the U.S. between 1830 and 1930, including letters and newspapers articles on the role of African...  (Binghamton University (NY), supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Grant-Kohrs Ranch commemorates America's frontier cattle era. The ranch—located north of Yellowstone in Deer Lodge, Montana—is among the best surviving examples of an economic strategy based on the...  (National Park Service)
Three Historic Nevada Cities: Carson City, Reno, Virginia City tells the stories of three cities established after the Comstock Lode discovery in 1859 brought a "reverse migration" from California. The stories, told by this travel itinerary of 57...  (National Register of Historic Places, supported by National Park Service)
The Penniman House: A Whaling Story focuses on one of the most successful whaling captains in New England. Edward Penniman was 11 in 1842 when he signed on as cook on a schooner. Years later, as a captain, he set sail...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Wright Brothers & The Invention of the Aerial Age celebrates the centennial of flight with a thorough presentation of Wilbur and Orville Wright's biography, their technical achievements and the cultural impact of their breakthrough in...  (National Air and Space Museum, supported by Smithsonian Institution)
Quake: 1906 San Francisco Quake tells why the April 18, 1906, earthquake along the San Andreas Fault was "one of the most significant earthquakes of all time." See photos, eyewitness accounts, the 1906 seismogram...  (U.S. Geological Survey)
Southern Nevada: The Boomtown Years provides more than 1500 primary documents, photos, and maps that tell the story of southern Nevada's boom towns (in the late 19th and early 20th centuries). Special sections focus on...  (UNLV, supported by Institute of Museum and Library Services)
Thanksgiving in North America: From Local Harvests to National Holiday looks at the history of Thanksgiving and provides a collection of paintings and images...  (Smithsonian Institution)
The Old Mormon Fort: Birthplace of Las Vegas, Nevada recalls the individuals and events leading to the creation of Las Vegas. In 1855, Brigham Young sent 30 men to farm, convert Indians, and build a settlement along a trail to the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
An American Success Story: The Pope House of Raleigh, NC tells the story of Manassa Pope, the first black man to receive a medical license in North Carolina (1886). After practicing medicine and helping establish a drug store and insurance...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Amana Colonies looks at the historic utopian society established in the 1850s along the Iowa River by German-speaking settlers from a religious group known as the Community of True Inspiration. The...  (National Park Service)
Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site: Birthplace of the Modern Presidency examines the career of our 26th President—the conditions under which he became a vice presidential candidate, the assassination of President McKinley, the home where TR was hastily...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Thurmond: A Town Born from Coal Mines and Railroads recounts the story of the New River Gorge area in West Virginia. It is mountainous and remained sparsely populated and largely inaccessible until 1873, when the Chesapeake and Ohio...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site: Monument to the Gilded Age describes this Hyde Park estate that includes a palatial Beaux-Arts mansion, stunning views of the Hudson River and Catskill Mountains, and over 600 acres of landscaped property. The...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Run for Your Lives! The Johnstown Flood of 1889 commemorates the most devastating flood in the U.S. in the 19th century. On the wet afternoon of 05/31, 1889, the inhabitants Johnston, Pennsylvania, heard a low rumble that grew to a...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Nineteenth-Century America in Art and Literature presents documents paired with 7 paintings, including Mahantango Valley Farm, Jolly Flatboatmen, and White Cloud, Head Chief of the Iowas. These...  (National Gallery of Art)
Samuel Gompers Papers Project is a documentary editing project that collects, annotates, and makes available primary sources of American labor history. It includes microfilm, photocopied material, and annotation...  (University of Maryland Department of History, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Race and Place: An African American Community the Jim Crow South recreates the contours of the African American community in Charlottesville, Virginia, during the start of this century. Narratives provide historical analysis as well as archival...  (University of Virginia, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
TR: The Story of Theodore Roosevelt is an online companion to a 4-hour PBS documentary. It features photographs, newspapers, motion pictures, and sound recordings; family diaries and letters; and interviews with...  (WGBH, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Crucible of Empire: The Spanish-American War examines the 1898 war with Spain, which steered the U.S. toward becoming a world power. Learn about Teddy Roosevelt, the Rough Riders, and the sinking of the U.S.S. Maine. Find a...  (South Carolina ETV, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
The Fight in the Fields: Cesar Chavez and the Farmworkers Struggle tells the story of a man, a union, and a time when millions of Americans joined a just cause. The Fight in the Fields is a portrait of Cesar Chavez, the charismatic leader of the...  (Independent Television Service, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
1897 Petition Against the Annexation of Hawaii recounts the struggle for control of Hawaii between native Hawaiians and American business interests in the late 1800s. This 1897 petition and a lobbying effort by native Hawaiians...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Panoramic Photography presents more than 20 panoramic photos: Chattanooga, TN, from a hilltop after the Union Army captured the city (1864); San Francisco after the earthquake (1906); the Panama Canal...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
The Development of the Industrial United States (1870-1900) offers documents and images for learning about Bell's patent for the telephone, Edison's patent for the electric lamp, Glidden's patent application for barbed wire, the Homestead Act...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Glidden's Patent Application for Barbed Wire presents the drawing and description that helped Joseph Glidden, a farmer from De Kalb, Illinois, win a patent for barbed wire in 1874. Glidden's design remains today the most...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
By Popular Demand: Votes for Women Suffrage Pictures, 1850-1920 offers photos of suffrage parades and pickets, cartoons commenting on the movement, and portraits of Sojourner Truth, Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and others...  (Library of Congress)
Taking the Long View: Panoramic Photographs, ca. 1851-1991 presents 4000 images of American cityscapes, landscapes, and group portraits...  (Library of Congress)
Origins of American Animation offers 21 animated films and 2 fragments, which span the years 1900 to 1921. The films include clay, puppet, and cut-out animation, as well as pen drawings. They point to a...  (Library of Congress)
America at Work, America at Leisure, 1894-1915 features motion pictures that showcase work, school, and leisure activities in the U.S. in the late 19th and early 20th century. The site includes films of the U.S. Postal Service from...  (Library of Congress)
Prairie Settlement: Nebraska Photographs and Family Letter illustrates the story of settlement on the Great Plains. Family letters of one homesteader express personal insight into the joy, despair, and determination in his struggle to...  (Library of Congress)
Inventing Entertainment: The Edison Companies features 341 motion pictures, 81 disc sound recordings, and other related materials, such as photographs and original magazine articles. Cylinder sound recordings will be added to this...  (Library of Congress)
Railroad Maps of North America offers progress report surveys for individual railroad lines, official government surveys, promotional maps, maps showing land grants and rights-of-way, and route guides published by...  (Library of Congress)
The Learning Page helps teachers use the Library of Congress's "American Memory" website to teach U.S. history and culture. It includes suggestions for using photos, objects, life histories and other...  (Library of Congress)
From Jim Crow to Linda Brown: A Retrospective of the African-American Experience, 1897-1953 helps students understand themes of African American life in the first half of the 20th century and explore to what extent the African American experience was "separate but equal."...  (Library of Congress)
African American Perspectives: Pamphlets from the Daniel A. P. Murray Collection, 1818-1907 presents a review of African-American history and culture as seen through the practice of pamphleteering. The site includes sermons on racial pride and essays on segregation, voting...  (Library of Congress)
History of the American West, 1860-1920 features 30,000 photos of Colorado towns and landscapes that document the role of mining in the history of Colorado and the West. Photos of Native Americans from more than 40 tribes...  (Library of Congress)
From Slavery to Civil Rights is a timeline of African-American history. Photos, broadsides, maps, and other items are organized around time periods: slavery, abolition, antebellum, Civil War, reconstruction...  (Library of Congress)
Travel and Westward Expansion is a collection of 50 books written in the 19th century that offer travelers' impressions of various parts of the U.S. or western territories...  (Library of Congress)
Chronicling America lets us search and read newspaper pages from 1900-1910 and find information about American newspapers published since 1690...  (Library of Congress)
The Last Days of a President: Films of McKinley and the Pan-American Exposition, 1901 provides 28 films that include footage of the Pan-American Exposition in Buffalo, President McKinley at his second inauguration, and McKinley's funeral. Two brief essays recall the...  (Library of Congress)
Photographs from the Chicago Daily News: 1902-1933 comprises over 55,000 images of urban life captured on glass plate negatives between 1902 and 1933 by photographers employed by the Chicago Daily News, then one of Chicago's leading...  (Library of Congress)
Nature's Fury invites students to read personal accounts of natural disasters in the U.S. during the late 1800s and early 1990s -- the great Chicago fire (1871), the Johnstown Flood (1889), the San...  (Library of Congress)
United We Stand provides primary source documents that students use to examine the working conditions of U.S. laborers at the turn of the century and to develop their own answers to a question: "Was...  (Library of Congress)
The Legacy of French Canadian Immigrants in New England draws on life histories and 19th century periodicals to help students develop their own answers to these questions: Why did French Canadian immigrants settle in New England in such...  (Library of Congress)
American Landscape and Architectural Design, 1850-1920 contains approximately 2,800 photographs, plans, maps, and models of American buildings and landscapes built during this period. The collection offers views of cities, buildings...  (Library of Congress)
Northern Great Plains, 1880-1920 shows 900 photographs from the Fred Hultstrand and F.A. Pazandak Photograph Collections of rural and small town life at the turn of the century. Highlights include images of sod houses...  (Library of Congress)
Photojournalism: A Record of War explores how and why war has been photographed and affords students an opportunity to see bias within war reporting. In addition to analyzing war photographs, students learn about...  (Library of Congress)
Panoramic Maps, 1847-1929 is a digitalized collection of this once popular cartographic form used to depict U.S. and Canadian cities and towns during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Known...  (Library of Congress)
Chicago Anarchists on Trial: Evidence from the Haymarket Affair, 1886-1887 showcases more than 3,800 images of original manuscripts, broadsides, photographs, prints, and artifacts relating to the violent 1886 confrontation between Chicago police and labor...  (Library of Congress)
Creating Hypertext Dialogues Drawn from Narrative History Collections invites students to use documents from "California As I Saw It: First Person Narratives, 1849-1900," to create hyperscripts depicting the motivations, expectations, fears, and...  (Library of Congress)
Learning About Immigration through Oral History is a lesson plan where a team of middle-school students search the Library of Congress website and other resources to learn how to conduct oral history interviews...  (Library of Congress)
The Spanish-American War in Motion Pictures features films and actualities taped in the U.S., Cuba, and Philippines showing troops, ships, notable figures, and parades, as well as reenactments of battles and other wartime...  (Library of Congress)
Affidavit and Flyers from the Chinese Boycott Case introduces students to one instance in which immigrants overcame the ramifications of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 through the U.S. judicial system. This lesson correlates to the...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Political Cartoons Illustrating Progressivism and the Election of 1912 offers teaching activities, four political cartoons, and a narrative about reforms proposed by three major presidential candidates in 1912: Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
The Sioux Treaty of 1868 examines Native American sovereignty and the Constitutional power granted to the president and the Senate to make treaties with foreign nations. The site presents the Treaty and...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
American History and Art from New England invites students to explore the history of New England and Massachusetts during three turns of the centuries: 1680-1720 (Colonial); 1780-1820 (Federal); and 1880-1920 (Progressive and...  (Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Elizabeth Cady Stanton and Susan B. Anthony Papers Project Online is an effort to locate and make available all of surviving manuscripts and printed texts from this 52-year friendship based on a mutual commitment to establish "perfect political...  (Rutgers University, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
Hardin County, Iowa presents 26 historic places—barns, civic buildings, churches, railroad depots, schools, and libraries—that depict the history of this county, known as the "Heart of the Heartland."...  (National Park Service)
Carnegie Libraries: The Future Made Bright tells the story of how Andrew Carnegie donated over $40 million from his fortune made in the railroad and steel industries to build more than 1,600 libraries across America. Photos...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Coffeyville, Kansas: The Town That Stopped the Dalton Gang recounts the bank robbery attempt that made Coffeyville famous in 1892. Bob Dalton's gang had been robbing trains, stealing horses, and looting gambling houses in the Midwest. But...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Little House in the Census: Almanzo and Laura Ingalls Wilder displays records from the 1880 and 1990 census schedules showing that Laura Ingalls, Almanzo Wilder, and families of the popular Little House on the Prairie series were not mere...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Santa Clara County, California's Historic Silicon Valley features 28 historic places that illustrate how this fertile valley blossomed from small agricultural towns linked by railroad into a center of technological innovation. Located south...  (National Park Service)
Log Cabins in America: The Finnish Experience tells why the log cabin was popular and important in settling the American frontier. The log cabins, barns, school, and other buildings examined by this website were constructed by...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Locke and Walnut Grove: Havens for Early Asian Immigrants in California looks at the contributions of early Asian immigrants to the development of California's economic and agricultural industries. The site also identifies obstacles encountered by Asian...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Ashland, Oregon -- From Stagecoach to Center Stage highlights 32 historic places in this community located 14 miles north of California at the foot of Mt. Ashland. These places together illustrate the development of Ashland from a...  (National Park Service)
Little Kinnakeet Lifesaving Station: Home to Unsung Heroes describes the lifesaving stations constructed from 1871-1915 along the coasts of the Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and Great Lakes to rescue ships in trouble. Little...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Fort Hancock: A Bastion of America's Eastern Seaboard is a lesson that uses this fort, built in the late 1800s to defend New York Harbor, as the basis for examining issues in U.S. defense policy and military preparedness during that time...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Frankish Building: A Reflection of the Success of Ontario, California helps students gauge the impact of the Chaffey brothers and Charles Frankish on Ontario, California, and compare their efforts with those of similarly important figures in their own...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Gold Fever! Seattle Outfits the Klondike Gold Rush focuses on the pivotal role that Seattle and Pioneer Square played as the chief outfitting and transportation center during the Klondike Gold Rush. It also looks at difficulties...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Skagway: Gateway to the Klondike examines the impact of the Klondike Gold Rush on the development of Skagway, Alaska. This lesson allows students to trace the development of Skagway from a homestead, to a gold rush...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Behind the Veil: Documenting African American Life in the Jim Crow South is a research project on African American life during the Jim Crow era (c. 1890s-1950s). It was a time of undeniable oppression and exploitation of black Americans; however, these 60...  (Center for Documentary Studies, supported by National Endowment for the Humanities)
America at the Centennial uses images and texts from the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition of 1876 to help students learn what the Exposition said about America at that time. Students work as historians using...  (Library of Congress)
Maps of Indian Territory, the Dawes Act, and Will Rogers' Enrollment Case File encourages students to study a variety of documents to understand the impact of a particular piece of legislation and relates to the powers granted to Congress in Article I, Section 8...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Photographs of Lewis Hine: Documentation of Child Labor encourages students to analyze dozens of photographs taken in the early 1900s depicting working conditions for child laborers. This lesson correlates to the National History Standards...  (National Archives and Records Administration)
Puerto Rico at the Dawn of the Modern Age, 1831-1929 portrays the early history of the commonwealth of Puerto Rico through first-person accounts, political writings, and histories drawn from the Library of Congress's general collections...  (Library of Congress)
California As I Saw It: First-Person Narratives of California's Early Years, 1849-1900 consists of texts and illustrations of 190 works documenting California's history from the Gold Rush to the turn of the century. It captures the pioneer experience; encounters between...  (Library of Congress)
Baseball Cards, 1887-1914 presents 2,100 early baseball cards. The cards show such legendary figures as Ty Cobb stealing third base, Tris Speaker batting, and pitcher Cy Young formally posing. Other notable...  (Library of Congress)
Small-Town America, 1850-1920 presents 12,000 photographs of New York, New Jersey, and Connecticut from the 1850s to the 1910s from a collection at the New York Public Library. The views show natural landscapes as...  (Library of Congress)
The African-American Experience in Ohio, 1850-1920 explores the diversity and complexity of African-American culture in Ohio. These manuscripts, texts, and images focus on themes that include slavery, emancipation, abolition, the...  (Library of Congress)
South Texas Border, 1900-1920: Photographs for the Robert Runyon Collection presents more than 8,000 of the photographer's items, including negatives, slides, prints, and postcards documenting the history and development of South Texas and the border. His...  (Library of Congress)
Tracking Down the Real Billy the Kid is a lesson in which students learn about the role of gunfighters in the settling of the West and analyze interviews with people who knew William H. Bonney, better known as Billy the...  (Library of Congress)
Indian Boarding Schools: Civilizing the Native Spirit inivites students to explore the forced acculturation of American Indians through government-run boarding schools. In the late 1800s, thousands of Native American children were sent...  (Library of Congress)
The Conservation Movement at a Crossroads: the Hetch Hetchy Controversy is a two-part teaching unit about the controversy among conservationists over a proposal to turn part of Yosemite National Park into a dam to furnish water to San Francisco. The first...  (Library of Congress)
To Market To Market helps students sharpen their observation and interpretation skills by inviting them to examine images from the turn of the centuries, circa 1900 and circa 2000...  (Library of Congress)
The Emerald Necklace: Boston's Green Connection recounts the creation of a series of parks in Boston in the 1880s. At that time, Boston was crammed with buildings and people. It was overcrowded, noisy, and dirty. City officials...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Don Henry Story: The Documents offers teaching activities using primary documents (tied to academic standards) on a student who became a leader in campus organizations, volunteered to fight in the Spanish Civil War...  (National Archives and Records Administration)

    About FREE      Privacy     Security     Disclaimer     WhiteHouse.gov     USA.gov   ED.gov