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National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places: 130 Resources

A Nation Repays Its Debt: The National Soldiers' Home and Cemetery in Dayton, Ohio tells how the federal government created a network of "soldiers' homes" and national cemeteries to honor Civil War veterans. The 110-acre Dayton cemetery contains the remains of...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Adeline Hornbek and the Homestead Act: A Colorado Success Story explores how Adeline Hornbek, single mother of four, defied traditional gender roles to become the owner of a successful ranch under the Homestead Act...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Allegheny Portage Railroad: Developing Transportation Technology shows the innovative transportation system used in the 1820s-1840s to tow railroad cars up and down the steep slopes of the Allegheny Mountains...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
America's Space Program: Exploring a New Frontier tells the story of America's journey to the moon. The creation of NASA, the Apollo vehicles, and the January 1967 tragedy are part of the story. On July 20, 1969, as the Eagle lunar...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
An American Success Story: The Pope House of Raleigh, NC tells the story of Manassa Pope, the first black man to receive a medical license in North Carolina (1886). After practicing medicine and helping establish a drug store and insurance...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Andersonville: Prisoner of War Camp examines the conditions of Camp Sumter (in Andersonville, Georgia), the largest and most notorious of prisoner of war camps during the Civil War...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
At a Crossroads: The King of Prussia Inn recounts the history of this inn, built originally as a farmhouse in 1719 at an intersection of two roads northwest of Philadelphia, not far from Valley Forge. The inn provided...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Attu: North American Battleground of World War II is the site of the only land battle on the North American continent during World War II. In June 1942, Japanese forces invaded Attu and other Aleautian islands. Americans feared the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Back Stairs at Brucemore: Life as Servants in Early 20th Century America looks at the role of servants at a 33-acre estate during the early 1900s. The 21-room mansion was built in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, in the 1880s with a separate entrance, dining area, and...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Battle of Bunker Hill: Now We Are at War describes how this American Revolution battle spurred colonial unity and sparked the formation of the Continental Army...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Battle of Glorieta Pass: A Shattered Dream examines a Civil War battle known as the "Gettysburg of the West." Texans invaded this mountain valley, intent on conquering New Mexico. Victory here would be a necessary prelude to...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Battle of Honey Springs: The Civil War Comes to the Indian Territory illustrates how the war, when it moved to the rolling prairie of now eastern Oklahoma, divided Native Americans. It includes maps, soldiers' accounts of the battle, and illustrations...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Battle of Mill Springs: The Civil War Divides a Border State focuses on a key Civil War battle to demonstrate how both the Union and the Confederacy attempted to win the loyalty of the citizens of Kentucky. The site presents maps, readings from...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Battle of Stones River: The Soldiers' Story provides readings, maps, and visual representations of this battle near Murfreesboro, Tennessee, which was the second bloodiest battle fought west of the Appalachians during the Civil...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Bethlehem, Pennsylvania: A Moravian Settlement in Colonial America looks at this area (along the Lehigh River) that became the center of industry and community for Moravians, a Protestant group that migrated to colonial America seeking opportunity and...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Birthplace of John F. Kennedy: Home of the Boy Who Would Be President takes students to JFK's birthplace and to the neighborhood where he grew up. It was here that JFK's parents began instilling the high standards and ambition that would make the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Boston's Arnold Arboretum: A Place for Study and Recreation provides readings, maps, and lesson ideas about the first arboretum in the U.S., which opened to the public in the 1880s. This site, though focused on a place devoted to the study of...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Brown v. Board: Five Communities That Changed America describes five cases the Supreme Court agreed to hear in 1952 under one title: Brown v. Board of Education. The cases originated in Delaware, Kansas, South Carolina...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Bryce Canyon National Park: Hoodoos Cast Their Spell looks at the history of this area in Utah known for its hoodoos -- limestones, sandstones, and mudstones that have been carved by erosion into spectacular spires, fins, and pinnacles...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Building America's Industrial Revolution: The Boott Cotton Mills of Lowell, Massachusetts features one of the oldest surviving textile mill complexes in the U.S. Learn how technology revolutionized the textile-manufacturing industry, and, in turn, affected mill...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Californio to American: A Study in Cultural Change looks at an area that was once part of an Indian village, then an outpost shelter for vaqueros (cowhands), and then the site where Californios (Spanish settlers in what is now the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Camp Chase Confederate Cemetery tells the story of Camp Chase, one of the largest prisoner-of-war camps for Confederate soldiers during the Civil War. Located on the western outskirts of Columbus, Ohio, the camp --...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Camp Misty Mount: A Place for Regrowth features a recreational demonstration area in western Maryland where land had been purchased during the 1930's to be transformed into a productive recreation area that would help put...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Carnegie Libraries: The Future Made Bright tells the story of how Andrew Carnegie donated over $40 million from his fortune made in the railroad and steel industries to build more than 1,600 libraries across America. Photos...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Castolon: A Meeting Place of Two Cultures depicts a small trading and farming community in far southwest Texas, near the border with Mexico (in the southwest corner of today's Big Bend National Park). Castolon was a farming...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Chatham Plantation: Witness to the Civil War recounts what happened at this plantation overlooking Fredericksburg, Virginia. The house served as a headquarters and communications center for generals and commanders. When General...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Chattanooga, Tennessee: Train Town helps students see how geography and promotion combined to encourage the growth of Chattanooga, Tennessee, and how railroads shaped the organization and architecture of this and other...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Chesterwood: Workshop of an American Sculptor describes the work and estate of one of America's most important sculptors. Daniel Chester French (1850-1931) produced more than 100 works—the statue of Abraham Lincoln for the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Chicago's Black Metropolis: Understanding History through a Historic Place is a curriculum-oriented site concentrating on the area, south of the main business district, where blacks lived in Chicago, Illinois. The site shows photos and maps of historic...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Chicago's Columbus Park: The Prairie Idealized presents the story of Jens Jensen, who immigrated from Denmark to the U.S. in the 1880s, took a job as a Chicago street sweeper, was promoted to gardener, and rose to renown as a...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Choices and Commitments: The Soldiers at Gettysburg aims to help students understand the Gettysburg Campaign and the major actions of the armies during each day of the battle, as well as the motives and experiences of several...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Clara Barton's House: Home of the American Red Cross is a curriculum-oriented guide to the life of the famous nurse. The site uses photographs, floor plans, and the like about her home in Glen Echo, Maryland as a focal point but gives...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Coffeyville, Kansas: The Town That Stopped the Dalton Gang recounts the bank robbery attempt that made Coffeyville famous in 1892. Bob Dalton's gang had been robbing trains, stealing horses, and looting gambling houses in the Midwest. But...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Decatur House: A Home of the Rich and Powerful examines the life of Stephen Decatur, a naval hero who died as a result of a duel in 1820, and considers the role the house he built played in the political and social scene of the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
First Battle of Manassas: An End to Innocence looks at the first conflict of the Civil War, the battle of Bull Run. More than 5,000 people perished -- Northern and Southern troops, as well as private citizens who came from...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
First Lady to the World: Eleanor Roosevelt at Val-Kill is a curriculum-oriented guide to the work of the active First Lady. The site uses a retreat she built on her husband's estate as a focus but gives readings and suggested school...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Floyd Bennett Field: Naval Aviation's Home in Brooklyn recounts the role of this airport in aviation history and World War II. In 1931, it was among the most advanced airports in the world. From it, early aviators launched pioneering and...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Fort Hancock: A Bastion of America's Eastern Seaboard is a lesson that uses this fort, built in the late 1800s to defend New York Harbor, as the basis for examining issues in U.S. defense policy and military preparedness during that time...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Fort Morgan and the Battle of Mobile Bay presents firsthand accounts, maps, and more pertaining to this Civil War conflict (August 5, 1864) in which Union Admiral David Farragut led about 20 ships and vessels into the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Fort Pickens and the Outbreak of the Civil War recounts what happened in the Pensacola Bay just before the Civil War. U.S. Army Lieutenant Adam Slemmer knew his 51 troops could not defend all four of their forts if Southern troops...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Frederica: An 18th-Century Planned Community recounts British efforts to establish Georgia as a utopia in the American wilderness (1730s) and to fortify the colony against Spanish encroachment, in part through the creation of a...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
From Canterbury to Little Rock: The Struggle for Educational Equality for African Americans highlights two historic places and the role each played in the effort toward creating equal educational opportunities for African Americans...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Glen Echo Park: Center for Education and Recreation traces the evolution of this Maryland site from a chapter of the Chautaqua movement, to an amusement park, to a national park...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Glorieta and Raton Passes: Gateways to the Southwest examines the role of these two passes in ensuring that the Southwest would become and remain part of the U.S. Learn about traders and armies that depended on the passes, which were...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Going-to-the-Sun Road: A Model of Landscape Engineering was the first highway by which visitors could see the lakes, glaciers, alpine peaks, and meadows of Glacier National Park. Work on the 50-mile route, which connected the east and west...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Gold Fever! Seattle Outfits the Klondike Gold Rush focuses on the pivotal role that Seattle and Pioneer Square played as the chief outfitting and transportation center during the Klondike Gold Rush. It also looks at difficulties...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Gran Quivira: A Blending of Cultures in a Pueblo Indian Village can help students understand daily life and how it changed for the Pueblo Indians of Gran Quivira, the largest of the three Salinas pueblos located in central New Mexico...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Growing into Public Service: William Howard Taft's Boyhood Home examines the family and setting in Cincinnati where the 27th President and Chief Justice of the Supreme Court grew up. It includes readings, maps, photos, and activities for students...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Guilford Courthouse: A Pivotal Battle in the War for Independence looks at this battle—how it was fought; how its outcome was characterized, including reports from both General Nathanael Greene and Lord Cornwallis; and why it was important. About...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Harry Truman and Independence, Missouri: features the home and story of our thirty-third President. Upon returning home after World War I, Truman married his childhood sweetheart, started a clothing store that failed, and...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Herbert Hoover: Iowa Farm Boy and World Humanitarian is a curriculum-oriented site using the birthplace of the American president to introduce readings and suggested theme topics for student papers. The site shows photos and drawings of...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Hopewell Furnace: A Pennsylvania Iron-making Plantation tells the story of one of the 65 small ironworks operating in southeast Pennsylvania during the American Revolution. The Hopewell Furnace, located in forested hills and valleys along...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Independence Hall: International Symbol of Freedom recounts the history of the building in Philadelphia where the Second Continental Congress signed the Declaration of Independence and where, a decade later, delegates to the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Invention Factory: Thomas Edison is a curriculum-oriented guide to the work and laboratories of the great American inventor. The site contains photographs, maps, and readings about the laboratories and the process of...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Iron Hill School: An African-American One-Room School is a curriculum-oriented guide focusing on a school constructed in 1923 in a rural area of northern Delaware, one of more than 80 schools for African-American children built between...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Keys Ranch: Where Time Stood Still tells the story of Bill Keys, whose ranch was the center of a desert network of homesteaders and miners in the early 1900s. At age 15, Keys left his Russian parents' home in Nebraska...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Kingston, New York: A National Register of Historic Places Travel Itinerary explores Kingston's over 300 years of history using 24 historic places that recall past eras when settlers and Native Americans warily shared its plains, proud Revolutionaries and...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Knife River: Early Village Life on the Plains describes village life in the Hidatsa and Mandan tribes during the peak of their culture in the early 19th century (North Dakota). It helps students compare information about these...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Liberty Ships and Victory Ships, America's Lifeline in War tells the story of two World War II ship-building efforts. In 1941, with war raging in Europe, President Roosevelt authorized the production of 441-foot cargo ships. These "Liberty...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Life on an Island: Early Settlers Off the Rock-Bound Coast of Maine examines the difficult lives and environment of everyday people on several of the 5,000 islands off the coast of Maine. It features stories about family life and includes a business...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Lincoln Home National Historic Site: A Place of Growth and Memory recounts the life of our 16th president. See photos of the house in Springfield, Illinois, that Abraham Lincoln, his wife, and family occupied for 17 years. Read news accounts of his...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Little Kinnakeet Lifesaving Station: Home to Unsung Heroes describes the lifesaving stations constructed from 1871-1915 along the coasts of the Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and Great Lakes to rescue ships in trouble. Little...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Locke and Walnut Grove: Havens for Early Asian Immigrants in California looks at the contributions of early Asian immigrants to the development of California's economic and agricultural industries. The site also identifies obstacles encountered by Asian...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Log Cabins in America: The Finnish Experience tells why the log cabin was popular and important in settling the American frontier. The log cabins, barns, school, and other buildings examined by this website were constructed by...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Mammoth Cave: Its Explorers, Miners, Archeologists, and Visitors explores a cave in southwestern Kentucky that, with more than 345 miles of explored passageways, is the longest cave in the world...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Martin Van Buren's "Return to the Soil" is a curriculum-oriented site using the home, named Lindenwald, the eighth President moved to after his term in office to introduce a discussion of Van Buren and his times. The site...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Mechanics Hall: Symbol of Pride and Industry traces the history of Mechanics Hall and Worcester back to the industrial revolution. Built by the mechanics association for classes, public debates, lectures, and entertainment, the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Memories of Montpelier: Home of James and Dolley Madison describes the setting, main house, and grounds of the home of our fourth President and the "father" of the Constitution. It also provides insights into daily life in the 19th century...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Minuteman Missile National Historic Site: Protecting a Legacy of the Cold War tells the story of one of the most significant strategic weapons in U.S. history: the Minuteman ICBM (Intercontinental Ballistic Missile). By 1965 there were 1,000 Minuteman ICBMs...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Mount Auburn Cemetery: A New American Landscape describes the country's first large-scale designed landscape open to the public. The cemetery, established four miles outside Boston in 1831, stood in stark contrast to barren, crowded...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
nanoHUB.org provides online simulations, learning modules, and interactive tools for learning about nanotechnology -- the design and production of structures, devices, and systems one atom or one...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
New Kent School and the George W. Watkins School: From Freedom of Choice to Integration looks at the 1968 Supreme Court ruling that ended a decade of resistance to school desegregation in the South (1955-1964) and triggered massive integration of schools (1968-1973). The...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
New Philadelphia tells the story of the first African American to plat and register a town before the Civil War. Born into slavery in 1777 in South Carolina, Frank McWorter moved to Kentucky with his...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Old Courthouse in St. Louis is exhibit about a place which, throughout the 19th century, served not only as a house of justice, but also as a public gathering place for pioneers planning their westward trek...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Paterson, New Jersey: America's Silk City examines conditions that led to the famous 1913 strike in a city that produced nearly half the U.S.'s manufactured silk. Conflicts between labor and management increased in the U.S...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Remembering Pearl Harbor describes the 1941 Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor and features the USS Arizona, a battleship on which 1,177 sailors and marines perished. Photos, charts, documents, and research...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Roadside Attractions is a lesson in which students examine five examples of roadside architecture built in the 1920s and 30s to catch the eye of passing motorists. They include the Teapot Dome Service...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Run for Your Lives! The Johnstown Flood of 1889 commemorates the most devastating flood in the U.S. in the 19th century. On the wet afternoon of 05/31, 1889, the inhabitants Johnston, Pennsylvania, heard a low rumble that grew to a...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Saint-Gaudens National Historic Site: Home of a Gilded Age Icon looks at this place in western New Hampshire where the sculptor Augustus Saint-Gaudens established a summer home and studio (1885), conceived a host of projects, became the leader of...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
San Antonio Missions: Spanish Influence in Texas explores a group of 18th-century missions in modern San Antonio to learn about the Spanish influence on native peoples and the patterns of Texas culture. Students can learn about the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Saratoga: The Tide Turns on the Frontier describes the two Battles of Saratoga. The two battles and surrender of the British in October of 1777 are often called the turning point of the American Revolution because they...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Saugus Iron Works: Life and Work at an Early American Industrial Site examines life and work at the first successful integrated ironmaking plant in colonial America (from 1646 until 1668, 10 miles north of Boston)...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Savannah, Georgia: The Lasting Legacy of Colonial City Planning describes the establishing of Georgia as a colony in America and the design of the settlement. When a friend in jail for debt died there, General James Oglethorpe, a member of the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Siege of Port Hudson: Forty Days and Nights in the Wilderness of Death describes the struggle for control of the vital Mississippi River during the Civil War. It discusses the tactics, theories, and ramifications of this battle between the North and the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Skagway: Gateway to the Klondike examines the impact of the Klondike Gold Rush on the development of Skagway, Alaska. This lesson allows students to trace the development of Skagway from a homestead, to a gold rush...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Spanish Treasure Fleets of 1715 and 1733: Disasters Strike at Sea discusses Spain's search for gold and silver in the New World (1500s-1700s) and its "treasure fleet system," which was intended to protect its treasure-laden ships from being seized by...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Springwood: Birthplace and Home to Franklin D. Roosevelt is the only place in the U.S. where a President was born, maintained a lifelong connection, and lies buried. The estate, located in Hyde Park on the Hudson River (New York), is where...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Teaching with Historic Places uses properties listed in the National Park Service's National Register of Historic Places to enliven history, social studies, geography, civics, and other subjects. TwHP has created...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Thaw in the Cold War: Eisenhower and Khrushchev at Gettysburg describes how President Eisenhower's personal diplomacy at his Gettysburg farm helped ease the tensions of the Cold War. The site offers photos and maps of the home as well as...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Battle of Bennington: An American Victory recounts a small but important triumph in the summer of 1777. For two months, General John Burgoyne led his army along the Lake Champlain-Hudson River corridor, capturing several...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Battle of Bentonville: Caring for Casualties of the Civil War shows how battlefield medical care developed during the Civil War, particularly in the Union Army...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Battle of Horseshoe Bend: Collisions of Cultures looks at the decisive battle of the Creek War (1813-1814), where Andrew Jackson fought 1,000 American Indian warriors who were trying to regain autonomy. It examines the history of...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Battle of Midway: Turning the Tide in the Pacific examines a pivotal World War II battle. In the spring of 1942, Japan attempted to establish a toehold in the Aleutian Islands, convert Midway into an air base for invading Hawaii, and...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Battle of Oriskany: Blood Shed a Stream Running Down tells how long-standing prejudices and the Revolutionary War unleashed massive bloodshed among inhabitants of New York's Mohawk Valley. Located in rich farmland and at a strategic...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Battle of Prairie Grove: Civilian Recollections of the Civil War helps students place the Battle of Prairie Grove in the context of Arkansas' role in the Civil War. Photos and readings from eye witness accounts of the battle depict the harsh...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Building of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal helps students realize the role canals played in western expansion and in the evolution of transportation by focusing on the construction of the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal. Students can...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Emerald Necklace: Boston's Green Connection recounts the creation of a series of parks in Boston in the 1880s. At that time, Boston was crammed with buildings and people. It was overcrowded, noisy, and dirty. City officials...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Forts of Old San Juan: Guardians of the Caribbean provides a history of Puerto Rico and the forts Spain established on the island to help protect its growing population and riches in the Caribbean...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Frankish Building: A Reflection of the Success of Ontario, California helps students gauge the impact of the Chaffey brothers and Charles Frankish on Ontario, California, and compare their efforts with those of similarly important figures in their own...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Freeman School: Building Prairie Communities examines a once common feature on the American West landscape: the one-room schoolhouse. This particular one-room school, originally known as the Red-Brick School House, served the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Great Chief Justice at Home offers photos of John Marshall's residence in Richmond, Virginia. This website also describes how Marshall, who wrote 519 opinions in his 34 years as chief justice (1801-1835)...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Hispano Ranchos of Northern New Mexico: Continuity and Change features the small subsistence farms, or ranchos, created by Hispanos, early Spanish settlers of New Mexico, during the 1800s in the mountain valleys of the Pecos and Mora rivers...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Joseph Bellamy House: The Great Awakening in Puritan New England examines the life and times of the Reverend Joseph Bellamy (1719-1790), a preacher, author, and educator in New England. At the age of 20, Bellamy became the minister in Bethlehem...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Lewis and Clark Expedition: Documenting the Uncharted Northwest recounts the expedition's crossing of the Lemhi Pass and Lolo Trail, and the time spent at Fort Clatsop near the Pacific Ocean. Although the Corps of Discovery did not realize its...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Liberty Bell: From Obscurity to Icon helps students analyze -- through maps, readings, and images -- the historical and cultural influences that shaped the symbolic meaning of the Liberty Bell...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The M'Clintock House: A Home to the Women's Rights Movement is a curriculum-oriented guide to a home in Waterloo, New York in which several early abolitionists, women's rights advocates, and social reformers lived. The site uses photos and...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The North Carolina State Capitol: Pride of the State tells the story of this state capitol -- how a committee settled on a location, how a new town (Raleigh) was laid out in 1792, and why the "political temple" erected in mid 1800s...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Ohio & Erie Canal: Catalyst of Economic Development for Ohio tells how the construction of this canal transformed one of the poorest states in the Union in the 1820s into the third most prosperous by 1840. The 308-mile canal helped open New...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Old Mormon Fort: Birthplace of Las Vegas, Nevada recalls the individuals and events leading to the creation of Las Vegas. In 1855, Brigham Young sent 30 men to farm, convert Indians, and build a settlement along a trail to the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Penniman House: A Whaling Story focuses on one of the most successful whaling captains in New England. Edward Penniman was 11 in 1842 when he signed on as cook on a schooner. Years later, as a captain, he set sail...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Siege and Battle of Corinth: A New Kind of War tells the story of two Civil War engagements near Corinth, a small Mississippi town established in the 1850s where two railroads crossed. On October 2, 1862, Confederates attacked...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Trail of Tears: The Forced Relocation of the Cherokee Nation tells about the removal of the Cherokee Nation from their ancestral homeland (NC, TN, GA, AL) to "Indian Territory" (now Oklahoma). After passage of the Indian Removal Act and the...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The United States Air Force Academy: Founding a Proud Tradition recounts the history of aviation and the military: aviation's entry into the military during World War I, Germany's use of air power early in World War II, Pearl Harbor, the Berlin...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The War Relocation Camps of World War II: When Fear Was Stronger than Justice examines the causes and effects of President Franklin Roosevelt's executive order, signed two months after the attack on Pearl Harbor, that moved nearly 120,000 Japanese and Japanese...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
The Washington Monument: Tribute in Stone focuses on George Washington's life, his impact on our nation, and the design and history of this famous memorial. Students are invited to evaluate proposed plans for the monument and...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Theodore Roosevelt Inaugural Site: Birthplace of the Modern Presidency examines the career of our 26th President—the conditions under which he became a vice presidential candidate, the assassination of President McKinley, the home where TR was hastily...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
These Honored Dead: The Battle of Rivers Bridge and Civil War Combat Casualties recounts a battle in a cold, rainy swamp in South Carolina during the last year of the war. In contrast to major campaigns and battles, this small battle presents the war on a human...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Thomas Jefferson's Plan for the University of Virginia: Lessons from the Lawn tells the story of the creation of the University of Virginia. After serving as President, Jefferson continued advocating for a statewide system of education in Virginia, hoping to...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Thurmond: A Town Born from Coal Mines and Railroads recounts the story of the New River Gorge area in West Virginia. It is mountainous and remained sparsely populated and largely inaccessible until 1873, when the Chesapeake and Ohio...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Tonto National Monument: Saving a National Treasure tells the story of the Salado people, who thrived in the Arizona valley where Tonto Creek joins the Salt River (1050-1450 AD). The Salado culture combined customs of several American...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Two American Entrepreneurs: Madam C.J. Walker and J.C. Penney features the life stories of two business people who lived the American Dream and who helped make that dream a reality for others in their communities. It tells how Walker, an African...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Vanderbilt Mansion National Historic Site: Monument to the Gilded Age describes this Hyde Park estate that includes a palatial Beaux-Arts mansion, stunning views of the Hudson River and Catskill Mountains, and over 600 acres of landscaped property. The...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Vieux Carré: A Creole Neighborhood in New Orleans looks at the history of the French Quarter, the heart and soul of modern New Orleans and a constant reminder of the city's Creole, colonial past...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Waterford, Virginia: From Mill Town to National Historic Landmark tells the story of a village west of Washington, D.C. In 1733, Amos Janney purchased 400 acres along Catoctin Creek and built a mill for grinding flour and sawing wood. As fellow...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Weir Farm: Home of an American Impressionist examines the farm acquired by painter Alden Weir (1852-1919), where he summered for nearly 40 years (northeast of New City). At a time railroads were expanding, populations were...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Wheat Farms, Flour Mills, and Railroads: A Web of Interdependence examines those three industries as they evolved together in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area and North Dakota during the late 1800s. The three depended on each other for success and...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
When Rice Was King concentrates on Georgetown County, South Carolina, where rice, rather than cotton, was the principal commercial product. The site contains maps, readings, photos, drawings, as well as...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Woodrow Wilson: Prophet of Peace examines President Wilson's struggle and ultimate failure to reach the ideal of achieving lasting world peace through the League of Nations. Through various activities students can...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Wright Brothers National Memorial: Site of the First Controlled Powered Flight tells how bicycle makers in Dayton, Ohio, launched the aviation age. After reading about the glider accident that killed Otto Lilienthal, Wilbur and Orville Wright spent four years...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
Ybor City: Cigar Capitol of the World reveals how immigrant cigar makers adapted to life in the U.S. in the late 19th and early 20th century while maintaining their ethnic identity. This lesson also describes Cuban...  (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)
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