Skip Navigation
FREE: Federal Resources for Educational Excellence - Teaching and Learning Resources From Federal Agencies
RSS



Home
Subject Map
Go
U.S. History Topics
Business & Work
Business (30)
Careers (20)
Economics (12)
Entrepreneurship (15)
Labor (12)
Ethnic Groups
African Americans (69)
Asian Americans (11)
Hispanic Americans (8)
Native Americans (34)
Famous People
Explorers (31)
Inventors (38)
Leaders (24)
Scientists (12)
Others (25)
Government
Congress (12)
Courts (14)
Elections (10)
Military (9)
Presidents (74)
U.S. Constitution (27)
Other (37)
Movements
Civil Rights (48)
Immigration & Migration (28)
Transportation (27)
Women's History (40)
States & Regions
California (29)
Massachusetts (16)
Midwest (26)
New Mexico (10)
New York (17)
Northeast (18)
Pennsylvania (18)
South (41)
Virginia (21)
West (46)
Others (7)
Wars
American Revolution (18)
Civil War (49)
World War I (17)
World War II (28)
Other Wars (31)
Other History & Soc Studies
Anthropology (13)
Geography (27)
Natural Disasters (12)
Religion & Society (18)
Slavery (25)
Other Resources (66)
 
What's New
Calendar

U.S. History Topics » Ethnic Groups » Native Americans

The Sioux Treaty of 1868

examines Native American sovereignty and the Constitutional power granted to the president and the Senate to make treaties with foreign nations. The site presents the Treaty and related documents, including a photograph of the Indian leader, Spotted Tail. Explanatory text, materials for teachers, and links to further resources accompany the documents. (National Archives and Records Administration)

   Go to this website

Interesting Fact:

The Black Hills of Dakota are sacred to the Sioux Indians. In the 1868 treaty, signed at Fort Laramie and other military posts in Sioux country, the United States recognized the Black Hills as part of the Great Sioux Reservation, set aside for exclusive use by the Sioux people.
Image of Spotted Tail, a Brulé Sioux Chief of great renown

Spotted Tail

 This website also appears in:
U.S. Time Periods »  1865-1920: Modern America » 

    About FREE      Privacy     Security     Disclaimer     WhiteHouse.gov     USA.gov   ED.gov