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U.S. History Topics » Government » Presidents

How Do I Become President?

displays winning posters designed by students to show what a person must do to become president of the U.S. (General Services Administration)

   Go to this website

Interesting Fact:

In the Electoral College system, each state gets a certain number of electors, based on each state's total number of representation in Congress. Each elector gets one electoral vote. For example, a large state like California gets 54 electoral votes, while Rhode Island gets only four. All together, there are 538 Electoral votes.
A summary of how to become the President of the United States presented in a timeline format.

Overall infographic winner


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