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U.S. History Topics » Government » Other

Democracy in Brief

gives a concise account of the intellectual origins, history, and basic values of democratic systems of government. The book examines topics such as rights and responsibilities of citizens, free and fair elections, the rule of law, the role of a written constitution, separation of powers, a free media, the role of parties and interest groups, military-civilian relations, and democratic culture. (Department of State)

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Interesting Fact:

Democracy is more than just a set of specific government institutions; it rests upon a well-understood group of values, attitudes, and practices -- all of which may take different forms and expressions among cultures and societies around the world. Democracies rest upon fundamental principles, not uniform practices.
In 1215, English nobles pressured King John of England to sign a document known as the Magna Carta.

Signing the Magna Carta


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