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U.S. Time Periods » 1763-1815: Revolution

Thomas Jefferson

explores the extraordinary legacy of Thomas Jefferson as a founding father, farmer, slaveholder, scholar, diplomat, and the third president of the U.S. Learn about his country estate and family, his efforts to reform politics and law in Virginia, his influence on the creation of our federal government, his commitment to exploring and claiming western lands, his vast library, and more. See 150 items, including documents he relied on when drafting the Declaration of Independence. (Library of Congress)

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Interesting Fact:

The Virginia Declaration of Rights was drafted by George Mason and Thomas Ludwell Lee (1730-1778) and adopted unanimously in June 1776 during the Virginia Convention in Williamsburg that propelled America to independence. It is one of the documents heavily relied on by Thomas Jefferson in drafting the Declaration of Independence. The Virginia Declaration of Rights can be seen as the fountain from which flowed the principles embodied in the Declaration of Independence, the Virginia Constitution, and the Bill of Rights.
Charles Willson Peale's vibrant life portrait shows Jefferson as he looked when serving as secretary of state in President Washington's cabinet. The portrait of Jefferson at aged forty-eight hung in

Charles Willson Peale's portrait

 This website also appears in:
U.S. History Topics »  Government »  Presidents
U.S. History Topics »  States & Regions »  Virginia
U.S. Time Periods »  1763-1815: Revolution » 

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