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U.S. History Topics » States & Regions » West

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features journal entries from 20 points in the journey of Lewis and Clark: mission preparations, winter in St. Louis, first council with Indians, death of Sergeant Floyd, first killing of a buffalo, Sioux camps, near run-in with Teton Sioux, Rocky Mountains, Nez Perce, falls of the Columbia River, and others. The site also provides letters from Thomas Jefferson to Lewis and Clark; images of people, places, plants, and animals; and maps. (Library of Congress)

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Interesting Fact:

On an April 27, 1803, Jefferson wrote a letter to Lewis, including instructions for the journey. He mentioned the need for secrecy concerning the mission's real purpose.
(1803) A map of North America.  This map, made by John Luffman, shows an outline view of North America.

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 This website also appears in:
U.S. History Topics »  Famous People »  Explorers
U.S. Time Periods »  1801-1861: Expansion » 

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