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U.S. History Topics » Business & Work » Labor

Paterson, New Jersey: America's Silk City

examines conditions that led to the famous 1913 strike in a city that produced nearly half the U.S.'s manufactured silk. Conflicts between labor and management increased in the U.S. during the early 20th century. In Paterson, on January 27, 1913, when Henry Doherty tried to extend a new "four-loom system" throughout his plant, 800 silk weavers walked out. More than 20,000 Paterson silk workers took part in the strike, which lasted over five months. (National Park Service, Teaching with Historic Places)

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Dye house workers, ca. 1900. (Courtesy of the Passaic County Historical Society)

Dye house workers, ca. 1900

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U.S. History Topics »  Business & Work »  Business
U.S. History Topics »  States & Regions »  Northeast
U.S. Time Periods »  1801-1861: Expansion » 

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