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U.S. History Topics » States & Regions » South

The Church in the Southern Black Community, 1780-1925

traces how Southern African-Americans experienced Protestant Christianity and transformed it into the central institution of community life. Coverage begins with white churches' conversion efforts and depicts the contradictions between the egalitarian potential of evangelical Christianity and the realities of slavery. It focuses on how the black community adapted evangelical Christianity, making it a metaphor for freedom, community, and personal survival. (Library of Congress)

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Interesting Fact:

Emancipation from slavery in 1863 posed distinctive religious challenges for African Americans in the South. When the Civil War finally brought freedom, the task of organizing religious communities was only one element of the larger need to create new lives -- to reunite families, to find jobs, and to figure out what it would mean to live in the United States as citizens rather than property.
Photo of Trinity Church, Augusta, GA

Trinity Church, Augusta, GA

 This website also appears in:
U.S. History Topics »  Ethnic Groups »  African Americans
U.S. History Topics »  Other History & Soc Studies »  Religion & Society

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